If your child has been charged with a crime and has been ordered probation, it is likely an extremely stressful time full of uncertainty. You may be wondering, “What happens next? What does probation mean for my child? Will my child’s future be jeopardized?” If your child is placed on probation, here is what he or she can expect.

Probation for Minors

If your child pled to a juvenile charge, there are numerous types of sentencing a court may order as a penalty, including probation. Probation is the most common disposition among juvenile cases. The program of supervision monitors, limits and restricts minor’s activities and freedom. In most cases, a minor must obey both the general terms of their probation as well as any other additional requirements personalized for their particular case. Additional requirements typically include community services, counseling, obeying curfews and maintaining attendance at school. In some cases, a minor may be ordered to attend additional educational services such as anger management, social skills building and other similar conditions.

How Long Can a Minor Be On Probation?

Probation for minors differs from probation for adults in that there is no set amount of time that a minor can be placed on probation. Typically, a minor who is ordered probation will remain on probation until they meet all of the conditions of their punishment. The judge who ordered the probation is the only individual who can release a minor from the terms of their punishments. Probation orders tend to follow minors into adulthood as well. For example, if a minor commits a new crime once they are legally considered an adult, many times the court will terminate juvenile probation in lieu of a more serious punishment. In most jurisdictions, the Juvenile Court can maintain this jurisdiction over a minor until they are 21 years of age.

If your child has been accused of a crime, contact the legal team at the Khonsari Law Group. Our skilled team of qualified attorneys will work diligently to defend your child’s rights, including attempting to fight the case or resolve the case for something less than the aforementioned probation. Do not risk jeopardizing your child’s future. Contact the Khonsari Law Group today to learn how we can help you and your child navigate through this difficult time.